Reputation management in a digital world – Dr Frances Ryan’s doctoral thesis now available as a full text pdf

Dr Frances Ryan

Dr Frances Ryan

Dr Frances Ryan graduated with her PhD in July 2019. Frances’ doctoral thesis Reputation management in a digital world: The role of online information in the building, management, and evaluation of personal reputations is now available to download as a full text pdf file from the Edinburgh Napier University repository. The abstract below summarises the thesis content.

Abstract

This work is concerned with the role of online information in the building, management, and evaluation of personal reputations. The main contributions of the research relate to: (1) the means by which people evaluate the personal reputations of others from the online evidence available to them, and (2) strategies for the building and management of personal reputations through the use of online information. The findings extend knowledge within the domain of Information Science, notably with respect to the established body of research on human information behaviour and use. They are set against a theoretical framework that is anchored to research in bibliometrics (for example on citation practice and citation analysis), and takes into account the multidisciplinary nature of the field of Information Science.

A multi-step data collection process was implemented following the practice of extant studies in Information Science and human information behaviour and use. This focused on a sample of forty-five UK-based social media users. A qualitative analysis of data collected from participant diaries and interviews was undertaken using NVivo10.

The main contribution of this work with respect to the evaluation of personal reputations on the basis on online evidence is that the information available is largely consumed and evaluated in a passive manner: social media users are more interested in the content of the information that is shared on social media platforms than they are in the signals that this information might convey about the sharer(s). Closer attention is paid in cases where the information shared is in stark contrast to the opinions and practices of those who consume it. In terms of the management of personal reputations through the use of online information, this work introduces and develops new concepts related to managing the “blur” that occurs at the intersection between private and professional lives, and online and offline environments.

RIVAL at the Royal Society of Edinburgh Awards Reception 2019

The RIVAL poster on display at the Royal Society of Edinburgh Awards Reception 2019

Last week, on Monday 9th September, I participated at the Royal Society of Edinburgh‘s (RSE) Annual Awards Reception. Each year this event provides a snapshot of the creative and innovative projects that are supported by the RSE and its partners: the Scottish Funding Council, Scottish Enterprise, BBSRC, STFC, BP, IBioIC and Fullbright. Continue reading

Social cognitive theory literature review article now in print

‘Applications and applicability of Social Cognitive Theory in information science research’ is now available in issue 51(4) (December 2019) of the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS). The article covers the origins and key concepts of Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) and its value to Information Science research. Particular reference is made to the applicability of SCT – and its applications – in studies of information-seeking behaviour and use, and knowledge sharing. Continue reading

Bookings fill up fast for RIVAL events 2, 3 and 4

RIVAL logoFollowing the success of the ‘taster’ Research, Impact, Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) project event on July 11th 2019, most of the places for the set of three network events on 7th November 2019, 19th March 2020, and 9th July 2020 have been booked. Continue reading

RIVAL Network event 1: review and resources

#lisrival RIVAL event 1 delegate badgesLast Thursday 11th July 2019 Dr Bruce Ryan and I hosted the first of four Royal Society of Edinburgh funded Research Impact Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) network events. Thirty-five people in total came to Edinburgh Napier University’s Sighthill campus for a day of presentations, discussion, and networking. Continue reading

Follow #lisrival today to join the first RIVAL Network event remotely

Today Dr Bruce Ryan and I are hosting the first of the four Royal Society of Edinburgh funded Research Impact Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) network events at Edinburgh Napier University’s Sighthill campus. Continue reading

Closing the researcher-practitioner gap: an exploration of the impact of an AHRC networking grant

Hazel Hall, Peter Cruickshank & Bruce Ryan

Paper co-authors Hazel Hall, Peter Cruickshank & Bruce Ryan

A new article entitled ‘Closing the researcher-practitioner gap: an exploration of the impact of an AHRC networking grant‘ is now available from Emerald as an EarlyCite paper in the Journal of Documentation. Those with subscription access can download the full pdf from the journal’s web site. The manuscript is also available to download free of charge from the Edinburgh Napier University Repository. I co-authored this work with my Centre for Social Informatics colleagues Peter Cruickshank and Bruce Ryan. Continue reading