Registrations open for free symposium on Everyday Life Information Seeking, and information behaviours in online environments, Edinburgh, Thursday 22 June 2017 #ELIS #CPCINapier

CPCI bannerInformation science researchers with interests in Everyday Life Information Seeking, and information behaviours in online environments, are invited to register for a research symposium to be held in Edinburgh on Thursday 22 June 2017. Registration is free to all (whether established academics, early career researchers or PhD students), with a number of travel bursaries available to support the participation of PhD students (please see below). Continue reading

What does it mean to be a dangerous woman? The case of the young widow

IASH logoOver the past ten months or so I have followed with interest the Dangerous Women Project. This is one-year initiative of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, led by Professor Jo Shaw. It was launched on International Women’s Day 2016 and will end on International Women’s Day 2017 on Wednesday 8th March with a closing event (free, ticketed) at the Scottish Storytelling Centre. Continue reading

How long does it take to write a PhD thesis?

My short answer is 68 days, but please read the detail below…

Bold resolutions PhD comic

Bold resolutions: “Piled Higher and Deeper” by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com

As a PhD supervisor I have often been asked ‘How long do you think it will take me to write up my thesis?’ My answer always begins ‘It depends…’ We then continue the conversation with an audit of material already drafted that may contribute (in edited format) to the final thesis. These include the initial literature review from the first year transfer report, and posters, conference papers and journal articles presented and/or published from the on-going work. Continue reading

Generation X, personal reputation, and social media: new publication in Information Research

Information Research header

Managing and evaluating personal reputations on the basis of information shared on social media: a Generation X perspective‘ has been published this week in Information Research. I co-authored this paper with Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Frances Ryan, and colleagues Peter Cruickshank and Alistair Lawson. Continue reading

From #asist2016 in Copenhagen to #ili2016 in London – and back home to Edinburgh again

#ASIST2016 & #ILI2016 brochures and lanyards Last month I participated at two conferences back-to-back: the 79th Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST2016) in Copenhagen from Friday 15th to Tuesday 18th October, and then the second day of Internet Librarian International (ILI2016) in London on Wednesday 19th October. Continue reading

Watching the workers: keynote presentation at #siguse16 #asist2016

ASIST 2016 logoToday I’m giving the opening keynote presentation in Copenhagen at the SIG USE Information Behavior in Workplaces. This is one of a series of workshops taking place as part of the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST2016). It has been organised by the SIG/USE Symposium Chairs:

The title of my presentation is ‘Watching the workers: researching information behaviours in, and for, workplaces‘. The slides are available on SlideShare and below.

Continue reading