Congratulations to Katherine Stephen for an excellent Masters dissertation on metaskills

Katherine Stephen

Katherine Stephen

Congratulations to our PhD student Katherine Stephen, who last week learnt that she was awarded 80% for the Masters dissertation component of her 1+3 PhD. Katherine’s studentship is a collaborative award funded by the ESRC and Skills Development Scotland, and comprises a Masters year at the University of Edinburgh (2018/19) prior to three years of doctoral study at Edinburgh Napier University (2019/22).

Katherine’s Masters dissertation took the form of an extended PhD proposal, and thus has the same title as her doctoral study: Metaskills maturity for future workplaces. The work that she completed for the dissertation last year included a small pilot study entitled Metacognitive experiences of artificial intelligence in the workplace.

In her dissertation Katherine explains that career landscapes are changing, and the future of individual workers is predicted to be predicated on adaptability and protean values. If this is the case, she argues, more important than technical skill in one area is the ability to form and implement cognitive strategies for managing situations as they arise. The processes required to create these strategic abilities are situated within ‘metacognition’ – thinking about thinking. Furthermore, a mature level of metacognition can assist in acquiring ‘metaskills’ – a variety of general competencies that complement the generation and application of technical abilities across domains. Although seen by some as by-products of specialist education, research has shown that metacognition and metaskills are able to be consciously developed alongside discipline-specific knowledge, and that experiential learning is a good way to encourage this.

In consolidating these concepts, and conducting research across apprenticeship cohorts in order to determine appropriate universal measurement and growth interventions, for her PhD Katherine will investigate ways in which workers can extend their metaskill development while continuing to learn new technical skills. This should contribute to the metaskills maturity of workplaces as cohesive units, and better prepare individual workers for job disruptions by allowing them the self-confidence to continue their careers with minimal cognitive disfluency.

RIVAL at the Royal Society of Edinburgh Awards Reception 2019

The RIVAL poster on display at the Royal Society of Edinburgh Awards Reception 2019

Last week, on Monday 9th September, I participated at the Royal Society of Edinburgh‘s (RSE) Annual Awards Reception. Each year this event provides a snapshot of the creative and innovative projects that are supported by the RSE and its partners: the Scottish Funding Council, Scottish Enterprise, BBSRC, STFC, BP, IBioIC and Fullbright. Continue reading

Bookings fill up fast for RIVAL events 2, 3 and 4

RIVAL logoFollowing the success of the ‘taster’ Research, Impact, Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) project event on July 11th 2019, most of the places for the set of three network events on 7th November 2019, 19th March 2020, and 9th July 2020 have been booked. Continue reading

RIVAL Network event 1: review and resources

#lisrival RIVAL event 1 delegate badgesLast Thursday 11th July 2019 Dr Bruce Ryan and I hosted the first of four Royal Society of Edinburgh funded Research Impact Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) network events. Thirty-five people in total came to Edinburgh Napier University’s Sighthill campus for a day of presentations, discussion, and networking. Continue reading

Follow #lisrival today to join the first RIVAL Network event remotely

Today Dr Bruce Ryan and I are hosting the first of the four Royal Society of Edinburgh funded Research Impact Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) network events at Edinburgh Napier University’s Sighthill campus. Continue reading

Event review: Bridging the gap between theory and practice roundtable, City University, 25th June 2019

Delegate at #oatap roundtable

Delegates at the roundtable event (photo credit Lyn Robinson)

Last week on Tuesday 25th June 2019 I was delighted to be one of approximately 40 invited library and information professionals and library and information science (LIS) researchers brought together to discuss the relationship between theory and practice, and to identify ways in which the theory/practice gap can be bridged. Continue reading