How do young people use networks when job seeking? Publication in press with the Journal of Documentation

Networking as an information behaviour during job search: an study of active job seekers in the Scottish youth labour market‘ is about the role of networking amongst 16-24 year old active job seekers living in Scotland.

Treating job search networking as an information behaviour, and underpinned by Wilson’s (1999) information seeking behaviour model, the informational role of networks in relation to labour market outcomes are elucidated in this paper.  I co-authored this work with Dr John Mowbray of the University of Glasgow, and we are pleased that it has recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of Documentation.

Our findings show that young job seekers acquire a range of networked information throughout the process of job search. This can help them to devise a job search goal, tailor job search products such as CVs and job applications, and source job vacancies. We also demonstrate that active networking can lead to access to a greater quantity of information, and an increase in the chances that others will mobilise on the behalf of job seekers to provide them with job-related information. Some of these contacts furnish tailored advice, and others – especially close contacts – help to ‘double up’ job seeking efforts by becoming active participants in the job search.

Also in our analysis we demonstrate that a positive relationship exists between frequent networking and interview invitations. This suggests that engaging with others on a regular basis can provide young people with an advantage when completing job search tasks.

However, it should be noted that the propensity for job seekers to network is contingent on a host of factors. These include the occupational level of the job role sought, motivation to find a job, and an awareness of the utility of networking as an information behaviour.

The full citation for the paper is: Mowbray, J. & Hall, H. (2019 in press). Networking as an information behaviour during job search: a study of active job seekers in the Scottish youth labour market. Journal of Documentation. It is accessible as a full text pdf manuscript from the Edinburgh Napier repository.

This work is an output from Dr John Mowbray’s PhD, which was funded by the ESRC and Skilled Development Scotland, and completed in 2018. John’s full thesis The role of networking and social media tools during job search: an information behaviour perspective is also available from the Edinburgh Napier repository.

PhD graduate Dr John Mowbray with his Director of Studies Professor Hazel Hall

Co-authors Dr John Mowbray & Professor Hazel Hall

Congratulations to Katherine Stephen for an excellent Masters dissertation on metaskills

Katherine Stephen

Katherine Stephen

Congratulations to our PhD student Katherine Stephen, who last week learnt that she was awarded 80% for the Masters dissertation component of her 1+3 PhD. Katherine’s studentship is a collaborative award funded by the ESRC and Skills Development Scotland, and comprises a Masters year at the University of Edinburgh (2018/19) prior to three years of doctoral study at Edinburgh Napier University (2019/22).

Katherine’s Masters dissertation took the form of an extended PhD proposal, and thus has the same title as her doctoral study: Metaskills maturity for future workplaces. The work that she completed for the dissertation last year included a small pilot study entitled Metacognitive experiences of artificial intelligence in the workplace.

In her dissertation Continue reading

Introducing new research students Rachel Salzano and Katherine Stephen

Rachel Salzano and Katherine Stephen at the Merchiston Tower

Rachel Salzano and Katherine Stephen at Edinburgh Napier’s Merchiston campus

Welcome to Rachel Salzano and Katherine Stephen, who join us this week as new research students within the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University. Continue reading

Social cognitive theory literature review article now in print

‘Applications and applicability of Social Cognitive Theory in information science research’ is now available in issue 51(4) (December 2019) of the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS). The article covers the origins and key concepts of Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) and its value to Information Science research. Particular reference is made to the applicability of SCT – and its applications – in studies of information-seeking behaviour and use, and knowledge sharing. Continue reading

Katherine Stephen to present at Tacit Engagement in the Digital Age

Katherine Stephen

Katherine Stephen

Congratulations to our Centre for Social Informatics colleague Katherine Stephen, who has recently learnt that her poster submission to Tacit Engagement in the Digital Age at the University of Cambridge next month has been accepted.

The purpose of the conference is to explore conceptions of tacit knowledge at a time when everyday life is increasingly augmented by artificial intelligence (AI). Katherine will present the research that she is currently undertaking for her Masters dissertation Metacognitive experiences of using AI in the workplace. (Katherine is completing her Masters degree at the University of Edinburgh as the first component of her 1+3 ESRC/SDS-funded PhD studentship on meta-skills maturity for future workplaces prior to joining us full-time in October to embark on her doctoral studies at Napier.) Continue reading

Fully-funded PhD opportunity: work-based learning, skills, and economic performance

ESRC-SDS-Napier studentship logos

We are readvertising a fully-funded PhD place within the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University for an October 2019 start date. Continue reading

Call for applications: two fully-funded PhD places within the Centre for Social Informatics, Edinburgh Napier University

ESRC-SDS-Napier studentship logos

We are currently advertising two fully-funded PhD places within the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University for an October 2019 start date. Continue reading