About Hazel Hall

Professor Hazel Hall is Professor of Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University, UK, Docent of Information Studies a Åbo Akademi, Finland.

Rachel Salzano contributes to the work of the Alan Turing Institute

Rachel Salzano

Rachel Salzano

The Alan Turing Institute is the UK’s national institute for data science and artificial intelligence. It was established in 2015 with headquarters at the British Library in London. The work of the Institute is achieved through collaborations between universities, businesses, and public and third sector organisations to address some of the biggest challenges in science, society and the economy.

Currently Rachel Salzano, a PhD student within the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University, is contributing to the institute’s research on detecting and understanding harmful content online. She has been employed by the Institute in two roles.

In her first role, Rachel is a member of a team of annotators who have been assisting with research into online abuse and hate speech as part of the Hate speech: measures and counter-measures project. This work has involved reviewing comments and posts in Reddit threads, then annotating them for hate speech against identities (e.g. race, gender, class, age, religion, nationality) and affiliations (e.g. jobs/careers, political parties) using an established taxonomy.

Rachel’s second role at the Alan Turing Institute is as a Policy Analyst. Here Rachel is assisting in policy research on the use of hate speech tools by policy makers, and means of regulating and detecting online abuse. In this work Rachel supports the research team across a range of activities including literature reviewing, developing questionnaire/interview questions, and conducting statistical analysis on data collected for the project.

Rachel is carrying out this work while working on her doctoral study on the influence of culture on the information behaviour and use in public libraries of newcomer populations such as immigrants and refugees. To find out more about Rachel’s PhD, please see her blogged PhD musings on her web site Librarian sans library.

Alan Turing Institute logo

How useful are social media for job hunting? Publication in press with the Journal of Information Science

journal of information science coverUsing social media during job search: the case of 16-24 year olds in Scotland‘ is about the the value of social media in providing information opportunities to young people seeking employment. This co-authored paper has recently been accepted for inclusion in the Journal of Information Science.

Based on an analysis of interview and focus group data, Dr John Mowbray (University of Glasgow) and I reveal that: Continue reading

A month in coronavirus captivity

I rarely write personally on this blog. That said, I have used this medium to relay some very personal news in the past, and it currently feels like the right place to reflect on these first few weeks of coronavirus lockdown. I also thought that it would be interesting to share some of the photographs that I have been taking in the limited amount of time that I have been out of my house during this period, one of which has been selected by the BBC as one of its series Your pictures of Scotland for 24th April to 1st May 2020. Continue reading

Hyperlocal democracy, tacit knowledge sharing, digital youth participation, and online reputation building and management: four more papers in JoLIS

Journal of Librarianship and Information ScienceThe last four articles of the seven that I developed with Centre for Social Informatics colleagues from the conference papers that we presented at i3 in 2017 have worked their way through the publication process, and can now be found in the print form with assigned volume, issue and page numbers in the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. The article titles and themes are: Continue reading

Digital identity security information practices of citizens (DISIPRAC) report now available

DISIPRAC reportDigital identity security information practices of citizens (DISIPRAC) is a project led by Peter Cruickshank.

On Thursday 27th February, Peter and our (then) Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr Frances Ryan (now at Aberdeen University) hosted a workshop on the DISIPRAC project themes. This took place at the Edinburgh Napier University Merchiston campus. Twelve people, all of whom help adults in the community, joined Peter and Frances to discuss three scenarios associated with facilitating access to services provided by UK, Scottish, and local governments. Continue reading

A new role at the UN for Dr Alicja Pawluczuk

Alicja Pawluczuk

Dr Alicja Pawluczuk

Congratulations to our PhD graduate Dr Alicja Pawluczuk who today (1st April 2020) starts a new work role as Young Information and Communication Technologies and Development Fellow at the United Nations University Institute in Macau.

Over the next twelve months, Alicja will be examining current approaches to digital inclusion measurement, and investigating digital inclusion practitioners’ narratives of their experience of digital inclusion measurement. The objective of Alicja’s fellowship is to analyse the state-of-the-art of digital inclusion measurement and evaluation on the basis of a systematic literature review. It is anticipated that outcomes of this research will inform UN policy-making on issues related to ICTs and sustainable development. Continue reading

New jobs for Dr Frances Ryan and (almost Dr) Leo Appleton

Dr Frances Ryan, who graduated with her PhD last summer, and Leo Appleton, who will cross the stage to pick up his doctoral degree certificate on 1st July 2020 (coronavirus permitting), have recently been successful in applications for new jobs. Congratulations to them both! Continue reading