Dr David Haynes wins best paper award at ISKO 2020

ISKO: International Society for Knowledge OrganizationCongratulations to our Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr David Haynes on winning the 2020 International Society for Knowledge Organization (ISKO) best paper award.

ISKO is a scholarly organisation concerned with the theory and practice of knowledge organisation. Its membership is drawn from a range of disciplines including information science, philosophy, linguistics, and computer science.

David’s award-winning paper is entitled Understanding personal online risk to individuals via ontology development. The abstract for the paper is given below.

Abstract: This paper describes the development of an ontology of risk as a way of better understanding the nature of the potential harms individuals are exposed to when they disclose personal data online. The ontology was designed to be compatible with BFO, the Basic Formal Ontology, which is intended to promote interoperability. Ontologies from domains such as genetics and medical research are in many instances designed to conform to BFO. An initial exercise to monitor the online activity of six participants from the library and information services community helped to identify the points at which personal data is disclosed during online activity. It also explored the motivations for these disclosures, by questioning participants about their perceptions of risk. The resulting analysis suggested that an ontology would be better than a typology to represent the complex relationships between risk concepts. Terms were also extracted from existing terminologies. Risk scenarios were developed and tested during a formative seminar and incorporated into the ontology. A potential application of the ontology is to identify clusters of risk and map the factors that contribute to specific risks.

Dr David Haynes

Dr David Haynes, ISKO 2020 best paper award winner

 

Using social media during job search: paper now available as PDF from Sage

Mowbray Hall 2020 Journal of Information ScienceThe article ‘Using social media during job search: the case of 16-24 year olds in Scotland‘, which I co-authored with Dr John Mowbray (University of Glasgow), is now available as a PDF from the Journal of Information Science. Continue reading

Centre for Social Informatics contributions to Information Seeking in Context 2020 #isic2020

ISIC 2020 banner logo

Hosted by the Department of Information Science at the University of Pretoria, Information Seeking in Context 2020 (#isic2020) takes place as a virtual conference between 28th September and 2nd October 2020. As has been the case in the past (e.g. 2018 in Kraków, Poland, 2016 in Zadar, Croatia), colleagues from the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University are looking forward to the opportunity of presenting some of their research at the ISIC conference. Continue reading

Paper accepted for #ASIST2020 on the development of a network for LIS researchers and practitioners in Scotland

ASIST2020 logoMy Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr Bruce Ryan and I are delighted that our short paper ‘Research Impact Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL): development, implementation and outcomes of a Scottish network for LIS researchers and practitioners‘ has been accepted for presentation at the (virtual) 83rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST2020). We are grateful to our Centre for Social Informatics Visiting Professor Brian Detlor for providing internal peer review feedback on an early draft of our paper, especially since the acceptance rate for short papers at the conference this year was just 48% this year. Continue reading

How useful are social media for job hunting? Publication in press with the Journal of Information Science

journal of information science coverUsing social media during job search: the case of 16-24 year olds in Scotland‘ is about the the value of social media in providing information opportunities to young people seeking employment. This co-authored paper has recently been accepted for inclusion in the Journal of Information Science.

Based on an analysis of interview and focus group data, Dr John Mowbray (University of Glasgow) and I reveal that: Continue reading

Hyperlocal democracy, tacit knowledge sharing, digital youth participation, and online reputation building and management: four more papers in JoLIS

Journal of Librarianship and Information ScienceThe last four articles of the seven that I developed with Centre for Social Informatics colleagues from the conference papers that we presented at i3 in 2017 have worked their way through the publication process, and can now be found in the print form with assigned volume, issue and page numbers in the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. The article titles and themes are: Continue reading

Digital identity security information practices of citizens (DISIPRAC) report now available

DISIPRAC reportDigital identity security information practices of citizens (DISIPRAC) is a project led by Peter Cruickshank.

On Thursday 27th February, Peter and our (then) Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr Frances Ryan (now at Aberdeen University) hosted a workshop on the DISIPRAC project themes. This took place at the Edinburgh Napier University Merchiston campus. Twelve people, all of whom help adults in the community, joined Peter and Frances to discuss three scenarios associated with facilitating access to services provided by UK, Scottish, and local governments. Continue reading

Why bother to share information for little visible return? Publication in press with Information Research

Talking to imagined citizens? Information sharing practices and proxies for e-participation in hyperlocal democratic settings has recently been accepted for publication in Information Research.

This work is concerned with the extent to which existing models of information sharing based on the tenets of exchange are applicable across a full range of contexts. Specifically, in this paper, Peter Cruickshank and I deploy an information sharing practice-based approach to explore the means by which hyperlocal representatives in Scotland handle their information sharing roles, and how they address their relationships with online ‘lurker’ audiences. Continue reading

Networking as an information behaviour during job search: paper now published in Journal of Documentation

networking job search Mowbray Hall 2020Dr John Mowbray and I were delighted to learn this week that our paper ‘Networking as information behaviour during job search: a study of active jobseekers in the Scottish youth labour market‘ is now published. It available in both online and in print in the Journal of Documentation: volume 76, issue 2. Continue reading

Networking as an information behaviour during job search: Emerald EarlyCite paper now available

Image result for The article ‘Networking as an information behaviour during job search: a study of active jobseekers in the Scottish youth labour market‘, which I co-authored with Dr John Mowbray (University of Glasgow), is now available as an EarlyCite paper from the Journal of Documentation.

In the paper we show that young job seekers acquire a range of networked information throughout a variety of tasks related to job search, and demonstrate the value of active networking during this process. We also highlight that the propensity for job seekers to network is contingent on a host of factors. These include the occupational level of the job role sought, motivation to find a job, and an awareness of the utility of networking as an information behaviour. Continue reading