Rachel Salzano wins bursary place at 2022 CILIP conference #CILIPconf22

Rachel Salzano

Rachel Salzano

Congratulations to Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Rachel Salzano, who has won a bursary to attend the 2022 Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) conference in Liverpool on 7th and 8th July.

The award is sponsored by CILIP’s Library and Information Research Group (LIRG). The purpose of LIRG is to promote the value of information research, and strengthen links between research with practice. As a qualified librarian who is currently undertaking a doctoral study that aims to influence practice as well as contribute to the development of theory, it is fitting that Rachel has been selected for the bursary.

Find out more about Rachel’s PhD in the PhD musings on her web site Librarian Sans Library.
CILIP conference 2022 logo

Strong showing from the Centre for Social Informatics at the ASIST 24-hour Global Conference

The two-day ASIST 24-hour Global Conference opens today across all time zones. Five members of the Centre for Social Informatics (CSI) will be presenting their research completed within the Centre in four presentations as part of the the Europe/Africa programme tomorrow (27th April 2022). They are: Continue reading

Paper acceptance at the 2022 Archives and Records Association conference for Edinburgh Napier team #ARA2022

ARA Conference

My colleagues Dr Bruce Ryan, Dr Iain McGregor and I have recently learnt that a submission that we made this January has been accepted for the Archives and Records Association UK and Ireland 2022 conference. This event runs from 31st August to 2nd September 2022 in Chester. The draft conference programme for the conference is already available, and registrations open. Continue reading

Paper acceptance at #CoLIS11 for Rachel Salzano and her supervision team

Rachel Salzano

Rachel Salzano

Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Rachel Salzano is looking forward to travelling to Oslo at the end of May to present a paper accepted for Conceptions of Library and Information Science CoLIS 2022.

Co-authored with her supervision team (myself, Dr Gemma Webster and Dr David Brazier) Rachel’s paper is concerned with the findings from an element of the empirical work that she has undertaken for her doctoral study: an analysis of documents gathered from Scottish local authorities on strategies to support the integration of newcomer populations who have entered the country as a result of forced migration. The specific focus of this piece of research is the perceived role of Scottish public libraries in such efforts. Continue reading

Centre for Social Informatics at iConference 2022 #iConf2022 #iConf22

iconference banner 2022The 2022 iConference opens today, with sessions running throughout the week until Friday 4th March. Hosted online by University College Dublin, Kyushu University, and the University of Texas at Austin, the 2022 conference theme is ‘Information for a better world: shaping the global future’. Continue reading

European Conference on Information Literacy 2021 (#ECIL2021) videos available

Although we have sorely missed opportunities to travel and hear in person about the research of our colleagues from across the world due to the pandemic restrictions, one advantage of the move to online delivery is that much conference presentation material of recent months has been captured as video.

A case in point is the European Conference on Information Literacy 2021 (ECIL2021), hosted by the University of Bamberg in September 2021. The ECIL YouTube channel now holds 113 video-recorded presentations from the conference, including those presented by two Centre for Social Informatics colleagues. Continue reading

Dr David Brazier and Marina Milosheva present this week at ECIL 2021 #ecil2021 #ecil21 #infolit

The European Conference on Information Literacy 2021 (ECIL2021) opens today, running for three days until Thursday 23rd September. The work of the Centre for Social Informatics (CSI) will be represented in two presentations at this online event. Continue reading

Katherine Stephen to present on the Imitation Game at the BSA Work, Employment and Society conference 2021

Katherine Stephen

Katherine Stephen

Congratulations to Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Katherine Stephen on the acceptance of a paper that she submitted for presentation at the British Sociological Association Work, Employment and Society conference 2021.

Katherine’s paper is entitled Investigating cognitive adaptability in new workplace cultures with the Imitation Game. Its content is focused on deployment of the Imitation Game to determine workers’ application of cognitive adaptability when entering new workplace cultures. Continue reading

Spreading the news of RIVAL at the 2021 CILIPS and SCURL conferences #cilips21

RIVAL logoFollowing the completion of our Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) funded Research Impact Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) project at the end of March 2021, Dr Bruce Ryan and I are each pleased to have an opportunity to speak about this work at two different conferences this week. The first is the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals Scotland (CILIPS) annual conference, which opened today. The second is the annual conference of the Scottish Confederation of University and Research Libraries (SCURL), which takes place on Wednesday. Continue reading

Using a multi-location, longitudinal focus group method to conduct qualitative research into the role of public libraries #QQML2021

Dr Leo Appleton

Dr Leo Appleton

The 13th Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries International Conference (QQML2021) takes place this week from Tuesday 25th until Friday 28th May. At the conference, Dr Leo Appleton, who completed his doctoral study within the Centre for Social Informatics last year, is presenting a paper that he and I have co-authored.

Entitled ‘Using a multi-location, longitudinal focus group method to conduct qualitative research into the role of public libraries‘, the theme of our paper is the novel multilocation longitudinal focus group method that Leo adopted for the empirical phase of his PhD research on the role of UK public libraries. In his presentation slot on Tuesday, Leo will discuss the value of data collection from fiftythree participants in three rounds of focus group meetings in eight UK public library authorities. He will explain that this approach generated a rich data set for qualitative analysis. In particular, he will draw attention to the increasing level of sophistication and depth of discussion amongst the study participants over the course of the three rounds of focus group meetings. Leo will also acknowledge participant attrition as the main drawback of this approach. Continue reading