An afternoon of Social Informatics lightning talks

Hazel Hall, Brian Detlor

Professors Brian Detlor & Hazel Hall

Dr Brian Detlor, Visiting Professor to the Social Informatics Research Group at Edinburgh Napier University, has been in the Edinburgh for the past week. Last Friday I was pleased to participate in one of the events organised to mark Brian’s visit: a lightening talk showcase of some the excellent research undertaken by researchers in the Social Informatics Research Group.

My own presentation was about the AHRC/Creative Informatics funded Platform to Platform project that I completed last year with Dr Bruce Ryan (PI) and Dr Iain McGregor (Co-I). This work involved the creation of a podcast series based on Lorna Lloyd’s Diary of the war, and an assessment audience engagement with archives in two different digital formats – (1) a Blipfoto journal of text and images, and (2) sound in podcast episodes. The slides for my presentation are available on SlideShare.

Lightning talk first page

Please click on the image to access the SlideShare deck

The other speakers and topics were:

  • Aleksander Bielinski – his doctoral research entitled ‘Enhancing labour market intelligence using machine learning.
  • Dr David Brazier – the impact of digitisation on people, and his four on-going PhD supervisions
  • Maria Cecil – her doctoral research entitled ‘Gendered information landscapes and their impact on routes into and through apprenticeships’.
  • Dr Peter Cruickshank – community councils’ online presences, the information literacy of community representatives, the ways in which staff in frontline public services help individuals manage their online identities, and links with the Library and Information Science department at the Universiti Malaya.
  • Drew Feeney – his doctoral research entitled ‘User-led approaches to digital literacies in older adults’.
  • Professor Diane Pennington – ethical metadata.
  • Dr Frances Ryan – human information behaviour in digital environments as this relates to everyday life, and her current project Librarians as proxies.
  • Rachel Salzano – public library soundscapes, building on her recently doctoral study ‘The influence of culture on perceived use of public libraries by forced migrants in Scotland and England’. (Rachel will be awarded her PhD at graduation on 7th July 2023.)
  • Tomasz Stupnicki – his doctoral research entitled ‘Multi-modal ubiquitous quantum self monitoring: a driver of mental health improvements in the prison environment‘.

After our very convivial and entertaining afternoon, the research chat continued at McLarens on the Corner in Merchiston over drinks. What an excellent way to start the weekend!

Social Informatics Research Group, lightening talk, Bruce Ryan, Diane Pennington, Drew Feeney, Maria Cecil, Hazel Hall, Tomasz Stupnicki, Aleksander Bielinski, Peter Cruickshank, Rachel Salzano

Session presenters: Dr Bruce Ryan, Professor Diane Pennington, Drew Feeney, Maria Cecil, Professor Hazel Hall, Tomasz Stupnicki, Aleksander Bielinski, Dr Peter Cruickshank, Rachel Salzano, & Dr David Brazier.

An evening at Lambeth Palace for the 2022 Janette Harley Award ceremony and the 2023 Maurice Bond Memorial Lecture

Last Wednesday I was delighted to travel to Lambeth Palace to attend the 2022 Janette Harley Award ceremony, and to hear the 2023 Maurice Bond Memorial Lecture. Continue reading

The power of audio – presenting archives via podcasts: submission accepted for Shaking the archive conference, Edinburgh, June 2023

Along with my colleagues Dr Bruce Ryan, Marianne Wilson, and Dr Iain McGregor, I am delighted that the submission that we made earlier this year to the Shaking the archive – reconsidering the role of archives in contemporary society conference has been accepted. Continue reading

National award recognises the Platform to Platform project: British Records Association Janette Harley Prize 2022 runner-up

LogoThe Edinburgh Napier University team that worked on the Platform to Platform (P2P) project to transform Lorna Lloyd’s Diary of the war into a podcast series is delighted to have learnt that this work has been highly commended as a runner-up for the British Records Association’s (BRA) 2022 Janette Harley Prize. This prize, awarded in memory of archivist Janette Harley (1951-2015), is intended to generate interest in archives, and raise awareness of research and achievements in the world of archives. Continue reading

Network development to narrow the LIS research-practice gap: Emerald EarlyCite paper now available

Amongst the latest articles published online ahead of print by the Journal of Documentation is one on narrowing the research-practice gap that I have recently co-authored with my Edinburgh Napier University colleagues Dr Bruce Ryan, Rachel Salzano, and Katherine Stephen.

Continue reading

Narrowing the research-practice gap through network building between researchers and practitioners: new paper accepted for publication in the Journal of Documentation

Cover of Journal of DocumentationFrom a network model to a model network: strategies for network development to narrow the LIS research-practice gap has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Documentation. I recently co-authored this article with my Edinburgh Napier University colleagues Dr Bruce Ryan, Rachel Salzano, and Katherine Stephen.

In this article we discuss the applicability of  strategies shown to work well in one model of network development to the development of another. It in an output of the Research Impact Value and LIS (RIVAL) project, funded by the Royal Society of Edinburgh between 2019 and 2021. We used the grant to bring together a collaborative network of Scotland-based Library and Information Science (LIS) researchers and practising library and information professionals interested in maximising the impact and value of library and information science research. Continue reading

Platform to Platform project presentation at the Creative Informatics showcase

creative informatics logoYesterday afternoon, Bruce Ryan and I headed over to Inspace to participate in the latest Creative Informatics showcase event organised by Vikki Jones and Caitlin McDonald. Members of eight project teams gave short presentations on their research, most of which have been funded in the last couple of years through small research grants. Continue reading

Spreading the word of Lorna Lloyd’s ‘Diary of the war’ podcast series at #ARA2022 and #BBCat100

Members of the Platform to platform (P2P) and Heritage organisations and podcasts: scoping study (HOPSS) project teams from the Centre for Social Informatics have enjoyed presenting their work at two conferences this month. First, at the start of September I attended part of the Archives and Records Association’s annual conference 2022 in Chester. Then, with my colleagues Dr Bruce Ryan and Marianne Wilson, I spent most of last week in Bradford at the BBC at 100 Symposium. Continue reading

Case study on the creative use of digitised archives: presentation on Lorna Lloyd’s ‘Diary of the War’ podcast series at #BBCat100

Bradford City Hall

Bradford City Hall

The BBC at 100 symposium is taking place in Bradford, and online, this week.

This afternoon (Wednesday 14th September) I’m presenting on a panel about the creative use of digital archives. This will be with reference to the production of the podcast series of Lorna Lloyd’s Diary of the war.

Supported by AHRC funding through the Creative Informatics programme, the Platform to Platform project team at Edinburgh Napier University worked on the podcast series between February and July 2022. We combined a personal chronicle of the early months of World War II with contemporaneous news material, some of which was sourced from the BBC Archive. Continue reading

How does engagement with an archive differ depending on its digital format? Preview of presentation on Lorna Lloyd’s Diary of the war at #ARA2022

This afternoon, I am delivering a paper on the Platform to platform (P2P) project at the Archives and Records Association’s annual conference, 2022 in Chester. In my presentation, I will be addressing two main questions.

  1. How do people engage with an archive digitised as a ‘performance’ in a non-fiction podcast series?
  2. How does this engagement compare with that when the audience accesses the same core archive material as online text and images?

Continue reading