Social media by proxy: a Carnegie Research Incentive Grant for Dr Gemma Webster

Dr Gemma Webster

Dr Gemma Webster

Congratulations to my Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr Gemma Webster, who has recently been awarded a Carnegie Research Incentive Grant (RIG). Such grants are offered to make it possible for Early Career Researchers like Gemma to undertake a short project as a Principal Investigator.

Gemma‘s application for funding is one of 59 that were successful from a total of 131 submissions in the last RIG application round (as noted in the Carnegie Trust’s analysis of RIG outcomes for the March 2018 deadline).

Gemma‘s project is entitled ‘Social media by proxy: strategies for managing the online profiles of adults with dementia’.

Gemma‘s interest in social media proxies has been prompted by the recognition that the use of social media by older people is increasing at the same time that instances of diagnosis of dementia are growing. In parallel, there is a need for more carers to manage the social media accounts of others who are vulnerable and/or incapacitated. With our colleague Frances Ryan, who will join the team when the projects starts in January 2019, Gemma will investigate the experiences of people who act as ‘social media proxies’ as they look after the social media profiles for adults in their care.

Data will be gathered from social media proxies to gain insights into how they manage social media profiles for other people. These data will be collected in two ways. First, social media proxies will be asked to keep participant diaries. Here, for a specific period, they will note and reflect upon the online activities that they carry out on behalf of others. Second, data will be collected by interviews during which the information practices that the social media proxies undertake on behalf of others will be discussed.

There are plans for the research to be reported in: (1) a project report; (2) an academic journal article; (3) guidance materials for social media proxies (for example, leaflets); and (4) an article in The Conversation. There will also be a dissemination event for stakeholders to include care home workers, carers of dementia patients, local authority officials, and members of third sector organisations that provide support to vulnerable and/or incapacitated groups.

For further information about the project, please email Gemma Webster: g.webster@napier.ac.uk.

The Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland

Workforce Mapping Project report now available for download

The full output of the Workforce Mapping Project that I led in 2014/15 as commissioned research for the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) and the Archives and Records Association (ARA) has been released. This is now available as a download from CILIP and from ARA (free of charge for members, £40 for others). Continue reading

Follow #lis_rival for updates on Research Impact Value & LIS at Edinburgh Napier today

RIVAL logo

Today we are hosting a one-day event on the theme of library and information science (LIS) research impact and value at Edinburgh Napier University’s Craiglockhart campus. My Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr Bruce Ryan is the main organiser of this event.

We’re pleased that Research Impact Value and LIS (#lis_rival) has sold-out, and that we will have representation from across the LIS communities at Edinburgh Napier University today. Amongst the delegates to be welcomed are academic, health, national, prison, public, school, and special librarians, as well as LIS academics, professional body officers, and independent consultants. Continue reading

Conceptualisations of LIS research impact and value: learning from the LIS Research Coalition and DREaM (#lis_rival)

#lis_rival delegate packsOver the past few days my colleague Dr Bruce Ryan and I have been busy finalising plans for Research Impact Value and LIS (#lis_rival), which takes place at Edinburgh Napier University Cariglockhart campus tomorrow. This work has included making up the delegate badges, filling the delegate packs (with the help of Lyndsey Middleton – thank you!), and confirming the catering arrangements.

I have also made the finishing touches to my own presentation ‘Conceptualisations of LIS research impact and value: learning from the LIS Research Coalition and DREaM (#lis_rival)‘. The slides for my presentation are available on SlideShare and below.

Successful submissions to #isic2018 for the Centre for Social Informatics

#ISIC2018 logoCongratulations to Alicja Pawluczuk and Lyndsey Middleton (née Jenkins) on the recent news that the conference submissions that they made in March this year to Information Seeking in Context (ISIC) 2018 have been accepted. The conference takes place in Kraków, Poland, 9-11 October 2018. Continue reading

Measuring the social impact of digital youth participation: new paper available on OnlineFirst

The seventh (and final) article that I recently co-authored for publication in the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS) has now been published as an OnlineFirst paper. Entitled ‘Youth digital participation: measuring social impact‘, the content of the article concerns scholarly debate around digital participatory youth projects, and approaches to their evaluation. My co-authors Alicja Pawluczuk, Colin F Smith, Gemma Webster and I reveal (1) an over-reliance on traditional evaluation techniques for such initiatives, and (2) a scarcity of models for the assessment of the social impact of digital participatory youth projects. Continue reading

Tacit knowledge sharing in online environments: paper available on OnlineFirst

Iris Buunk

Iris Buunk

The sixth of the seven articles that I recently co-authored for the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS) has now been published as an OnlineFirst paper. This is ‘Tacit knowledge sharing in online environments: locating ‘Ba’ within a platform for public sector professionals‘ by Iris Buunk, Colin F. Smith, and Hazel Hall. It reports findings from Iris‘ doctoral study, which I supervise with Colin.

With reference to the concept of Ba (Nonaka and Konno, 1998), and based on empirical research conducted in the UK public sector, we draw two main conclusions in our article. First, online social platforms play a strong role in the facilitation of tacit knowledge sharing, and this leads to outcomes of learning, expertise sharing, problem solving, and innovating. Second, such platforms are important to the initiation of discussions among experts, the fostering of collective intelligence, and making tacit and personal knowledge visible and accessible quickly, with minimal effort. Continue reading