How do young people use networks when job seeking? Publication in press with the Journal of Documentation

Networking as an information behaviour during job search: an study of active job seekers in the Scottish youth labour market‘ is about the role of networking amongst 16-24 year old active job seekers living in Scotland.

Treating job search networking as an information behaviour, and underpinned by Wilson’s (1999) information seeking behaviour model, the informational role of networks in relation to labour market outcomes are elucidated in this paper.  I co-authored this work with Dr John Mowbray of the University of Glasgow, and we are pleased that it has recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of Documentation.

Our findings show that young job seekers acquire a range of networked information throughout the process of job search. This can help them to devise a job search goal, tailor job search products such as CVs and job applications, and source job vacancies. We also demonstrate that active networking can lead to access to a greater quantity of information, and an increase in the chances that others will mobilise on the behalf of job seekers to provide them with job-related information. Some of these contacts furnish tailored advice, and others – especially close contacts – help to ‘double up’ job seeking efforts by becoming active participants in the job search.

Also in our analysis we demonstrate that a positive relationship exists between frequent networking and interview invitations. This suggests that engaging with others on a regular basis can provide young people with an advantage when completing job search tasks.

However, it should be noted that the propensity for job seekers to network is contingent on a host of factors. These include the occupational level of the job role sought, motivation to find a job, and an awareness of the utility of networking as an information behaviour.

The full citation for the paper is: Mowbray, J. & Hall, H. (2019 in press). Networking as an information behaviour during job search: a study of active job seekers in the Scottish youth labour market. Journal of Documentation. It is accessible as a full text pdf manuscript from the Edinburgh Napier repository.

This work is an output from Dr John Mowbray’s PhD, which was funded by the ESRC and Skilled Development Scotland, and completed in 2018. John’s full thesis The role of networking and social media tools during job search: an information behaviour perspective is also available from the Edinburgh Napier repository.

PhD graduate Dr John Mowbray with his Director of Studies Professor Hazel Hall

Co-authors Dr John Mowbray & Professor Hazel Hall

RIVAL returns! Follow #lisrival today follow to hear the latest from the RIVAL network on research, impact, value and LIS

Today Dr Bruce Ryan and I are hosting the second of the four Royal Society of Edinburgh funded Research Impact Value and Library and Information Science (RIVAL) network events. The members of the RIVAL network are meeting in central Edinburgh at St Cecilia’s Hall from 10:00 onwards to discuss the impact and value of library and information science research and – in particular – the ways to maximise this in practice. Continue reading

Newly published: autumn 2019 edition of the Centre for Social Informatics flyer

We have a newly updated Centre for Social Informatics flyer for autumn 2019. Please follow the link to read about the work of our group, including details of research expertise, funders, recent PhD completions, and recent publications. The flyer includes profiles of the academic and research staff within our group: Continue reading

An award and an appointment at ASIST in Australia #asist2019 #asist19

Last week many members of the worldwide Information Science community gathered in Melbourne, Australia for the 82nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST). I was sorry not to be there myself. This was due to my teaching commitments this semester, in particular my final year undergraduate Knowledge Management module.

Abebe Rorissa, Brian Detlor, #asist2019, #asist19, Hazel Hall, Clarivate, teacher, award

Dr Abebe Rorissa presents Dr Brian Detlor with Hazel’s ‘Outstanding Information Science Teacher’ award (Photo credit: Becky Willson)

Despite my lack of physical presence at the conference, I kept an eye on the hash-tagged tweets from the event (#asist2019; #asist19). I was particularly interested in the Twitter stream around breakfast time (in the UK) on Tuesday 22nd October when the delegates in Melbourne were sitting down for the conference dinner and awards ceremony. This was because Visiting Professor to the Centre for Social Informatics Dr Brian Detlor had kindly agreed to step up to the stage to accept the 2019 Clarivate Analytics Outstanding Information Science Teacher Award on my behalf.

The award was presented by Abebe Rorissa of the University of Albany – thank you! I should also thank Rebekah (Becky) Willson of McGill University for taking photographs during the presentation. Continue reading

Congratulations Dr Alicja Pawluczuk!

Alicja Pawluczuk Gemma Webster

Dr Alicja Pawluczuk and Dr Gemma Webster

Congratulations to our Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr Alicja Pawluczuk! Alicja was one of nine School of Computing PhD graduands at the Edinburgh Napier University graduation ceremony at the Usher Hall yesterday afternoon.

Alicja’s PhD is entitled Youth digital culture co-creation: measuring social impact in Scotland. The purpose of the research was to develop knowledge of social impact evaluation of youth digital projects in Scotland. Dr Gemma Webster was Alicja’s Director of Studies, her second supervisor was Dr Colin Smith, and I was her third supervisor. For further information about the specifics of the research questions, outcomes, theoretical contributions, and recommendations from the work, please see Alicja’s #digiIMPACT page on her web site at www.alicjapawluczuk.com.

Following the graduation ceremony, several of Alicja’s colleagues and fellow PhD students joined her at Café Grande in Bruntsfield to toast her success. Continue reading

Congratulations to Katherine Stephen for an excellent Masters dissertation on metaskills

Katherine Stephen

Katherine Stephen

Congratulations to our PhD student Katherine Stephen, who last week learnt that she was awarded 80% for the Masters dissertation component of her 1+3 PhD. Katherine’s studentship is a collaborative award funded by the ESRC and Skills Development Scotland, and comprises a Masters year at the University of Edinburgh (2018/19) prior to three years of doctoral study at Edinburgh Napier University (2019/22).

Katherine’s Masters dissertation took the form of an extended PhD proposal, and thus has the same title as her doctoral study: Metaskills maturity for future workplaces. The work that she completed for the dissertation last year included a small pilot study entitled Metacognitive experiences of artificial intelligence in the workplace.

In her dissertation Continue reading