What’s your reputation? Newly published research on parallels between academic and personal reputation building, management and evaluation

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Build, manage, and evaluate: information practices and personal reputations on social media platforms, has just been published in the December 2019 issue of Information Research. I co-authored this paper with Dr Frances Ryan, Peter Cruickshank, and Alistair Lawson. Its content draws on some of the findings from Frances’ doctoral study on the use of online information in the management of personal reputation. Continue reading

Conference contributions from the Centre for Social Informatics to #EBLIP10 and #CoLIS10

The 2019 summer conference season is now well underway!

This week is a particularly busy one for colleagues who share the research interests of those of us in the Centre for Social Informatics (CSI), with two international events running simultaneously between 16th and 19th June: Continue reading

Social media by proxy: study participants sought

My Centre for Social Informatics colleagues Dr Gemma Webster and Frances Ryan are currently recruiting participants for their Carnegie-funded research project that investigates the ways in which carers manage, or help to manage, the social media accounts for people with dementia. The type of participant that they seek are those who play such a role for a cared-for person. The participants do not, however, need to be primary carers of people with dementia. Continue reading

School of Computing New Year research event 2019: contributions from the Centre for Social Informatics

Professor Hazel Hall presents at the School of Computing research event, 9th January 2019

The School of Computing research event, 9th January 2019 (photo credit Rameez Asif)

In recent years, the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University has marked the beginning of the new year with a research event. This year we held it on Wednesday 9th January 2019. Continue reading

Congratulations Dr John Mowbray!

PhD graduate Dr John Mowbray with his Director of Studies Professor Hazel Hall

PhD graduate Dr John Mowbray with his Director of Studies Professor Hazel Hall

Congratulations to Dr John Mowbray, who was awarded his PhD at the Edinburgh Napier University graduation ceremony at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh yesterday. I was John’s Director of Studies, his second supervisor was Professor Robert Raeside, and third supervisor Pete Robertson.

John’s PhD was funded by an ESRC Skills Development Scotland Collaborative studentship. We won the grant for the award through a competitive process administered by the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science in spring 2014, and John came to us later in the October of that year having applied for the PhD studentship that we advertised in June 2014. Continue reading

Social media by proxy: a Carnegie Research Incentive Grant for Dr Gemma Webster

Dr Gemma Webster

Dr Gemma Webster

Congratulations to my Centre for Social Informatics colleague Dr Gemma Webster, who has recently been awarded a Carnegie Research Incentive Grant (RIG). Such grants are offered to make it possible for Early Career Researchers like Gemma to undertake a short project as a Principal Investigator.

Gemma‘s application for funding is one of 59 that were successful from a total of 131 submissions in the last RIG application round (as noted in the Carnegie Trust’s analysis of RIG outcomes for the March 2018 deadline).

Gemma‘s project is entitled ‘Social media by proxy: strategies for managing the online profiles of adults with dementia’. Continue reading

Tacit knowledge sharing in online environments: paper available on OnlineFirst

Iris Buunk

Iris Buunk

The sixth of the seven articles that I recently co-authored for the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS) has now been published as an OnlineFirst paper. This is ‘Tacit knowledge sharing in online environments: locating ‘Ba’ within a platform for public sector professionals‘ by Iris Buunk, Colin F. Smith, and Hazel Hall. It reports findings from Iris‘ doctoral study, which I supervise with Colin.

With reference to the concept of Ba (Nonaka and Konno, 1998), and based on empirical research conducted in the UK public sector, we draw two main conclusions in our article. First, online social platforms play a strong role in the facilitation of tacit knowledge sharing, and this leads to outcomes of learning, expertise sharing, problem solving, and innovating. Second, such platforms are important to the initiation of discussions among experts, the fostering of collective intelligence, and making tacit and personal knowledge visible and accessible quickly, with minimal effort. Continue reading