How do young people use networks when job seeking? Publication in press with the Journal of Documentation

Networking as an information behaviour during job search: an study of active job seekers in the Scottish youth labour market‘ is about the role of networking amongst 16-24 year old active job seekers living in Scotland.

Treating job search networking as an information behaviour, and underpinned by Wilson’s (1999) information seeking behaviour model, the informational role of networks in relation to labour market outcomes are elucidated in this paper.  I co-authored this work with Dr John Mowbray of the University of Glasgow, and we are pleased that it has recently been accepted for publication in the Journal of Documentation.

Our findings show that young job seekers acquire a range of networked information throughout the process of job search. This can help them to devise a job search goal, tailor job search products such as CVs and job applications, and source job vacancies. We also demonstrate that active networking can lead to access to a greater quantity of information, and an increase in the chances that others will mobilise on the behalf of job seekers to provide them with job-related information. Some of these contacts furnish tailored advice, and others – especially close contacts – help to ‘double up’ job seeking efforts by becoming active participants in the job search.

Also in our analysis we demonstrate that a positive relationship exists between frequent networking and interview invitations. This suggests that engaging with others on a regular basis can provide young people with an advantage when completing job search tasks.

However, it should be noted that the propensity for job seekers to network is contingent on a host of factors. These include the occupational level of the job role sought, motivation to find a job, and an awareness of the utility of networking as an information behaviour.

The full citation for the paper is: Mowbray, J. & Hall, H. (2019 in press). Networking as an information behaviour during job search: a study of active job seekers in the Scottish youth labour market. Journal of Documentation. It is accessible as a full text pdf manuscript from the Edinburgh Napier repository.

This work is an output from Dr John Mowbray’s PhD, which was funded by the ESRC and Skilled Development Scotland, and completed in 2018. John’s full thesis The role of networking and social media tools during job search: an information behaviour perspective is also available from the Edinburgh Napier repository.

PhD graduate Dr John Mowbray with his Director of Studies Professor Hazel Hall

Co-authors Dr John Mowbray & Professor Hazel Hall

Who wants to do a PhD? You do! Apply by Friday 5th July for a funded doctoral study at Edinburgh Napier University

Centre for Social Informatics bannerThe School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University is currently advertising three funded PhD places. Applications are due by Friday 5th July 2019, with the successful applicants embarking on their doctoral studies in academic year 2019/20. The funding includes fees (UK/EU rates) and a stipend (living allowance) at the standard UK rate (currently £15,009 per annum). Continue reading

From PhD to the workplace: job destinations of doctoral students

Alicja Pawluczuk, Lyndsey Middleton, Dr John Mowbray, Lynn Killick, and Frances Ryan

Alicja Pawluczuk, Lyndsey Middleton, Dr John Mowbray, Lynn Killick, and Frances Ryan

Over the past six months four of the doctoral students within the Centre for Social Informatics who have recently completed, or are close to completion, of their PhDs have already embarked on their post-PhD careers. Continue reading

Call for applications: two fully-funded PhD places within the Centre for Social Informatics, Edinburgh Napier University

ESRC-SDS-Napier studentship logos

We are currently advertising two fully-funded PhD places within the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University for an October 2019 start date. Continue reading

Congratulations Dr John Mowbray!

PhD graduate Dr John Mowbray with his Director of Studies Professor Hazel Hall

PhD graduate Dr John Mowbray with his Director of Studies Professor Hazel Hall

Congratulations to Dr John Mowbray, who was awarded his PhD at the Edinburgh Napier University graduation ceremony at the Usher Hall in Edinburgh yesterday. I was John’s Director of Studies, his second supervisor was Professor Robert Raeside, and third supervisor Pete Robertson.

John’s PhD was funded by an ESRC Skills Development Scotland Collaborative studentship. We won the grant for the award through a competitive process administered by the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science in spring 2014, and John came to us later in the October of that year having applied for the PhD studentship that we advertised in June 2014. Continue reading

Journal of Librarianship and Information Science #i3rgu 2017 special issue published

i3 logoThe September 2018 issue of the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (50(3)) has just been published. This is a special issue that brings together ten expanded versions of conference papers that were presented at Information: interactions and impact (i3) 2017 in June last year (2017).

Amongst this collection are two articles by Edinburgh Napier University colleagues: Continue reading

Job search information behaviours: an ego-net study of networking amongst young job-seekers: paper available on OnlineFirst

John Mowbray

John Mowbray

The second of the seven articles that I recently co-authored for the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS) has now been published as an OnlineFirst paper. The article is entitled ‘Job search information behaviours: an ego-net study of networking amongst young job-seekers‘.

Through the analysis of a set of egocentric networks of young job-seekers, my co-authors John Mowbray, Professor Robert Raeside, Pete Robertson and I reveal the key informational role of network contacts in job-seeking as one that extends beyond the simple diffusion of information about employment opportunities.

In the article we develop some of the findings from John Mowbray‘s ESRC/Skills Development Scotland funded doctoral study that were presented as a conference paper at Information: interactions and impact (i3) 2017 in June last year (slides; liveblog). The full manuscript of the article is also available to download from the Edinburgh Napier repository. Continue reading