Funded Social Informatics PhD opportunities at Edinburgh Napier University: apply by 15th January 2023

If you would like to study for a PhD from October 2023, the Social Informatics Research Group at Edinburgh Napier University is currently advertising the following projects:

  1. Behaviour change for cybersecurity: Increasing awareness and reducing susceptibility – supervised by Dr JP Vargheese
  2. A new model for information literacies of community representatives – supervised by Dr Peter Cruickshank
  3. Online safety and digital literacy – supervised by Dr David Haynes
  4. Organisational learning and agile coaching – supervised by Dr Pritam Chita and Dr Peter Cruickshank
  5. Policy changes for inclusion of disabled students in HE – supervised by Dr Debbie Meharg
  6. Privacy and identity in the metaverse – supervised by Dr David Haynes
  7. Trust, risk and digital identity for digitally-unsure citizens – supervised by Dr Peter Cruickshank

Continue reading

All set for #asist20

ASIST2020 logoFollowing three days of virtual pre-conference workshops and the annual doctoral colloquium, the annual meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology 2020 ‘proper’ opens today.  The opening keynote speaker is Houman Haddad, Head of Emerging Technologies, United Nations World Food Programme (Nobel Peace Prize winner). He will present to the online audience on blockchain technology for humanitarian assistance at 09:00 EDT (13:00 GMT in the UK).

Several members of the Centre for Social Informatics are making co-authored contributions to ASIST 2020: Continue reading

Newly published: ‘Digital youth work: the youth worker’s balancing act between digital innovation and digital literacy insecurities’

Information Research logoAmongst the papers from Information Seeking in Context (ISIC) 2018 published in the latest issue of Information Research is an article that I co-authored with my Centre for Social Informatics colleagues Alicja Pawluczuk, Dr Gemma Webster, and Dr Colin Smith.

In the paper we discuss the ways in which UK youth workers perceive their work in the context of digital literacy project facilitation. The findings, which derive from the analysis of data from interviews conducted with twenty digital youth workers, reveal (a) that youth workers are both excited and sceptical about the digital developments in the field, and (b) an anxiety associated with the lack of digital literacy skills in the youth work sector.

The paper is available in full text from the Information Research web site. A PDF of the manuscript can also be downloaded from the Edinburgh Napier University repository.

#ISIC2018 logo