Rachel Salzano to present poster on culture as a concept in LIS research at #ASIST2020

ASIST2020 logo Congratulations to Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Rachel Salzano on the acceptance of her poster submission for presentation at the (virtual) 83rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST2020) next month. The submission, which Rachel prepared with two supervisors (myself and Dr Gemma Webster), is entitled ‘Coralling culture as a concept in library and information science research’. The abstract for Rachel’s poster reads:

Individuals’ cultural backgrounds influence their use of societal resources, including libraries. A literature search and review was completed on the treatment of culture in library and information science (LIS) in the body of work on information behaviour and use. While much of the literature reviewed cites culture as an important influence, few researchers define culture as a concept, nor do they explore in detail the factors that it comprises. In this body of work culture is primarily used in two ways: (1) to differentiate groups of library users; and (2) to draw attention to questions of integration.

The full text of the submission is available to download as a pdf from the Edinburgh Napier University repository.

Poster presentation in Copenhagen: Mapping the UK Information Workforce at #asist2016

Heering Copenhagen

Some colour under a cold grey sky in Copenhagen

I’ve been in Copenhagen since the end of last week, participating at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology. I’ve been enjoying the presentations – from Greg Welch‘s keynote on telepresence to Debbie Rabina‘s account of research of prisoners’ information needs examined through discourse analysis – and catching up with colleagues from around the world.

There’s some really interesting work being conducted in Information Science across the globe, and I’ve learnt about some tempting job opportunities too. For example, if you’re functionally bilingual in English and French, and looking for a tenure-track position in North America, the University of Ottawa’s School of Information Studies – l’École des sciences de l’information (ÉSIS) – is hoping to recruit an Associate Professor who can make contributions to teaching and research in  library and information management. Do contact Mary Cavanagh (mary.cavanagh@uottawa.ca,@mfcavanagh) if this is of interest to you. I’ve also managed to play tourist a little with a short visit the city (in the cold and grey) on Sunday morning with my Finnish colleague Gunilla Widen. Continue reading

School of Computing Research Student Conference 2016

Update post-conference: Four of the CSI students won awards at the conference. Frances Ryan won first prize for the best third year full presentation. John Mowbray won second prize for his second year 20×20 presentation and Iris Buunk third prize for hers. Lyndsey Jenkins won second prize in the first year poster competition.

Two students have blogged about the conference: Lyndsey at http://lyndseyjenkins.org, and Frances at http://justaphd.com.


School of Computing Research Student Conference 2016 logoToday the research students in the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University are hosting their annual conference (hashtag #socphdconf). The event has been organised by a committee of six students, three of whom are from the Centre for Social Informatics: Frances Ryan, Iris Buunk and Lyndsey Jenkins. The other student organisers are Baraq Ghaleb, John McGowan and Andreas Steyven. My colleague Dr Kevin Chalmers, who was previously involved in this series of conferences when a research student in the School himself, has also been helping out with the preparations for the event. Continue reading