Seven JoLIS paper acceptances for CSI #i3rgu

File:Journal of Librarianship and Information Science.jpgLast summer members of the Centre for Social Informatics delivered nine papers at Information: interactions and impact (i3) 2017. Following the conference, we were given the opportunity to develop this work into submissions for the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS). We took up this offer by working seven of the nine conference papers up to full journal article manuscripts. These were all submitted by the deadline of September 30th 2017. Following peer review and revisions all seven were accepted, and they will be published in JoLIS in due course. The manuscripts for all accepted articles have now been added to the Edinburgh Napier repository, and can be downloaded by clicking the article titles below.

UK public library roles and value: a focus group analysis
By Leo Appleton, Hazel Hall, Alistair Duff and Robert Raeside
Results from a longitudinal study on the role of the public library in the twenty-first century are analysed. Amongst active public library users there is a strong sense of the epistemic role of public libraries, conceived as safe, welcoming spaces that belong to local communities. Here public library users learn new skills, further their education, develop their careers, and make new contacts. Public library use also facilitates participation in society, and provides resources to allow individuals and communities to fulfil their societal obligations.

Tacit knowledge sharing in online environments: locating ‘Ba’ within a platform for public sector professionals
By Iris Buunk, Hazel Hall and Colin F Smith
With reference to the concept of Ba (Nonaka and Konno, 1998), and based on new empirical research conducted in the UK public sector, the authors draw two main conclusions. First, online social platforms play a strong role in the facilitation of tacit knowledge sharing, and this leads to outcomes of learning, expertise sharing, problem solving, and innovating. Second, such platforms are important to the initiation of discussions among experts, the fostering of collective intelligence, and making tacit and personal knowledge visible and accessible quickly, with minimal effort.

Practices of community representatives in exploiting information channels for citizen democratic engagement
By Hazel Hall, Peter Cruickshank and Bruce Ryan
Explored in the article are the practices of elected (yet unpaid) community councillors in Scotland as they exploit information channels for democratic engagement with citizens. The main finding of this CILIP-ILG group sponsored study is that community councillors engage with a range of information sources and tools in their work, the most important of which derives from local authorities. Recommendations from the analysis relate to (i) information literacy training; (ii) valuing information skills; and (iii) the role of the public library service in supporting community council work.

Applications and applicability of Social Cognitive Theory in Information Science research
By Lyndsey Jenkins, Hazel Hall and Robert Raeside
The origins and key concepts of Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) are introduced, and illustrated, with examples from the broad range of subject domains to which it contributes. A detailed analysis of SCT’s contribution to Information Science research is then given. The article concludes with reference to the part that SCT plays in an ESRC-funded study of employee-led workplace learning and innovative work behaviour.

Job search information behaviours: an ego-net study of networking amongst young job-seekers
By John Mowbray, Hazel Hall, Robert Raeside and Peter Robertson
Drawing on findings from an ERSC-funded study that deployed social network analysis, the authors argue that network contacts play a role in job-seeking that extends beyond the simple diffusion of information about employment opportunities. The outcomes of the work demonstrate the utility of studying job search from an information perspective, and generate recommendations for implementation at national policy levels.

Youth digital participation: measuring social impact
By Alicja Pawluczuk, Colin F Smith, Hazel Hall and Gemma Webster
Scholarly debate around digital participatory youth projects, and approaches to their evaluation, are explored to reveal (1) an over-reliance on traditional evaluation techniques for such initiatives, and (2) a scarcity of models for the assessment of the social impact of digital participatory youth projects.

Blurred reputations: managing professional and private information online
By Frances Ryan, Peter Cruickshank, Hazel Hall and Alistair Lawson
Through a discussion of results from research on patterns of information behaviour and use on social media platforms conducted as a study of Everyday Life Information Seeking (ELIS), it is concluded that: (1) the portrayal of different personas online contribute to the presentation (but not the creation) of identity, (2) information sharing practices for reputation building and management vary from platform to platform, and (3) the management of online connections and censorship are important to the protection of reputation.

For links to all the i3 conference paper abstracts, slides, liveblogs, and project blogs for the work cited above, please see the table at the blog post Information: interactions and impact (i3) 2017 review #i3rgu, published on July 18th 2017.

Information: interactions and impact (i3) 2017 review #i3rgu

CSI staff Peter Cruickshank, Dr Laura Muir, Professor Hazel Hall & Visiting Professor Brian Detlor at #i3RGU

Centre for Social Informatics colleagues Peter Cruickshank, Dr Laura Muir, Professor Hazel Hall & Visiting Professor Brian Detlor gather at #i3RGU

This blog post was updated in March 2018 to include links to the full text of seven manuscripts of articles developed from nine of the papers presented by CSI staff at i3 2017. These articles will be published in the Journal of Librarianship and Information Science (JoLIS) later in 2018.

Information: interactions and impact (i3) 2017 took place at Robert Gordon University at the end of last month from Tuesday June 27th until Friday June 30th 2017, with a packed programme for delegates who had travelled to Aberdeen from across the world. As in previous years, staff and research students from the Centre for Social Informatics (who didn’t have too far to travel) enjoyed participating at the event. We delivered a total of nine papers, as summarised in the table below. Continue reading

Congratulations Lyndsey Jenkins: awarded a John Campbell Trust travel bursary

Lyndsey Jenkins

Lyndsey Jenkins

Many congratulations to Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Lyndsey Jenkins on the award of a John Campbell Trust travel bursary.

Lyndsey will use the bursary later this year to support a visit to Turku, Finland, where she will gather case study data for her ESRC-funded doctoral study on workplace learning and innovative work behaviours. Professor Gunilla Widén, and other members of the Information Studies group at Åbo Akademi University, will host Lyndsey’s visit. Lyndsey also intends to deliver a seminar presentation on her study while she is with Gunilla’s team.

The John Campbell Trust was established as an independent charitable trust through the bequest of the late Dr John Campbell. Campbell was an early member of the Institute of Information Scientists. The trust is administered by a body of Trustees under the chairmanship of Professor Adrienne Muir (Robert Gordon University). The purpose of the Trust is to further the education and development of information professionals through grants, scholarships, research or travel awards, to enhance the knowledge and experience of the information community as a whole.

Centre for Social Informatics at the Edinburgh Napier University research conference 2017 #NapRes17

CSI colleagues Frances Ryan, Hazel Hall, Iris Buunk, Brian Detlor, David Jarman (Business School), Bruce Ryan, Peter Cruickshank, Lyndsey Jenkins and Lynn Killick

Centre for Social Informatics colleagues Frances Ryan, Hazel Hall, Iris Buunk, Brian Detlor, David Jarman (Business School), Bruce Ryan, Peter Cruickshank, Lyndsey Jenkins and Lynn Killick at the Edinburgh Napier Research Conference 2017 (Photo credit Bill Buchanan)

It’s currently conference season in academia and over the past couple of weeks the staff and research students from my research group have participated in a number of events, both in Edinburgh and beyond. Indeed PhD student Alicja Pawluczuk is still on the road this week, flying the flag for the Centre for Social Informatics at the 2017 British HCI Conference, organised by the HCI research groups at the University of Sunderland and Edinburgh Napier University in conjunction with the Interaction Specialist Group of BCS. Continue reading

Looking forward to i3 and iDocQ 2017 #i3rgu #iDocQ2017

i3 logoEvery other year the Information: interactions and impact (i3) conference brings an international community of academic and practitioner researchers together in Aberdeen to explore the quality and effectiveness of the interactions between people and information, and how such interactions can bring about change. In the years in which it takes place, i3 is one of the highlights of the conference season. (For a flavour of the event please see my review from two years ago, and the others to which I link in my 2015 post.) Continue reading

A copy-writing role with Information Research for Lyndsey Jenkins

Information Research logoCongratulations to Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Lyndsey Jenkins, newly appointed to the team of copy-editors (or ‘editorial associates’) for Information Research. Continue reading