Love your PhD #PhDates

#PhDate logoDo (did/would) you love your PhD? Last week a number of Edinburgh Napier University PhD students celebrated Valentine’s Day by explaining why they are passionate about their doctoral research. Amongst them was one of the students that I supervise: John Mowbray.

John is conducting ESRC-funded research that explores the networking behaviours of young job seekers from an information behaviour perspective. He is one of two students in my research group whose work is co-sponsored by Skills Development Scotland. (The other is Lyndsey Jenkins.)

See the #PhDate post on the Edinburgh Napier web pages to read about:

  • John’s passion for Information Science research;
  • How the strong external reputation of Edinburgh Napier’s Centre for Social Informatics and his director of studies attracted John to apply to Napier to undertake a PhD;
  • John’s desire for the findings of his thesis (due to be submitted later this year) to make an impact.

John has also written a short review about taking part in the #PhDates campaign on his own web site.

John Mowbray

John Mowbray

How long does it take to write a PhD thesis?

Bold resolutions PhD comic

Bold resolutions: “Piled Higher and Deeper” by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com

As a PhD supervisor I have often been asked ‘How long do you think it will take me to write up my thesis?’ My answer always begins ‘It depends…’ We then continue the conversation with an audit of material already drafted that may contribute (in edited format) to the final thesis. These include the initial literature review from the first year transfer report, and posters, conference papers and journal articles presented and/or published from the on-going work. Continue reading

Watching the workers: keynote presentation at #siguse16 #asist2016

ASIST 2016 logoToday I’m giving the opening keynote presentation in Copenhagen at the SIG USE Information Behavior in Workplaces. This is one of a series of workshops taking place as part of the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST2016). It has been organised by the SIG/USE Symposium Chairs:

The title of my presentation is ‘Watching the workers: researching information behaviours in, and for, workplaces‘. The slides are available on SlideShare and below.

Continue reading

Centre for Social Informatics at #ASIST2016, Copenhagen

ASIST logoNext week I will be attending the 2016 Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) Annual meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark. On the evening of Tuesday 18th October there will be a University reception at the conference. I have created a flyer to distribute at this event with Frances Ryan (one of my PhD students, whose participation at the conference is supported by the John Campbell Trust). The flyer provides details about the Centre for Social Informatics (CSI) at Edinburgh Napier University. Continue reading

Information Seeking in Context 2016 #isic2016: reviews

Presents from Croatia

A postcard and some presents, featuring (l to r) Lyndsey Jenkins, Iris Buunk, Frances Ryan, and John Mowbray

The research students from the Centre for Social Informatics who participated at Information Seeking in Context (ISIC) 2016 from 20th to 23rd September returned to the office this week.

As well as enthusiastic tales of the Croatia and the conference itself, Iris Buunk, Lyndsey Jenkins, John Mowbray, and Frances Ryan also brought back to Edinburgh some rather delicious goodies and a fun selfie postcard of the four of them enjoying the sunshine on the Adriatic.

All four students have now reviewed the conference and associated doctoral workshop on their blogs. To find out more, please see:

ISIC 2016: contributions from the Centre for Social Informatics #ISIC2016

Image result for isic 2016 zadar

Four PhD students from the Centre for Social Informatics –  Iris Buunk, Lyndsey Jenkins, John Mowbray, and Frances Ryan – are in Zadar, Croatia this week for Information Seeking in Context (ISIC) 2016. Today they are taking part in the pre-conference doctoral workshop. Tomorrow they will join the conference itself, which continues until Friday. You can follow both the doctoral workshop and conference on Twitter hashtag #isic2016. Continue reading

Congratulations Lyndsey Jenkins: co-author of best paper at #I3E2016

Lyndsey Jenkins

Lyndsey Jenkins

Many congratulations to Centre for Social Informatics PhD student Lyndsey Jenkins on winning a ‘best paper’ award with co-authors Ruoyun Lin and Debora Jeske at the 15th IFIP Conference on e-Business, e-Services and e-Society last week.

The winning paper is entitled ‘Influences and benefits of role models on social media’. On the basis of their empirical work, the authors argue that having a role model is associated with greater perceived support for one’s career aspirations, and access to information. In addition, those who have role models online report that their online profiles give more realistic self-presentations of their values and priorities. These individuals also have higher expectations of reciprocity in online environments. Continue reading