Organisational learning and innovation in Scotland: research student Lyndsey Jenkins begins her study

Lyndsey Jenkins

Lyndsey Jenkins

Welcome to Lyndsey Jenkins who has just joined us as a new research student within the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University. I am Lyndsey’s Director of Studies, with Professor Robert Raeside, Director of the Employment Research Institute at Edinburgh Napier University, as second supervisor. Lyndsey’s study is entitled Enhancing the capacity for workplace learning and innovation in Scotland. 

This ESRC-funded research will investigate innovation and best practice in skills development in the workplace in Scotland, drawing comparisons with the rest of the UK and other countries. Lyndsey will explore how employee-led workforce learning can be encouraged to deliver innovation that leads to competitive advantage, employment growth, and increased productivity. The aims of the work are to:

  1. Identify factors that underpin successful workplace learning and innovation.
  2. Determine how skills innovation in the workplace is facilitated by organisational culture and strategy.
  3. Demonstrate how a skills agency can support innovation in the workplace.
  4. Formulate practical and workable recommendations to policy makers concerned with the skills agenda in Scotland.

The study will furnish insight into how existing knowledge is shared, used, stored, and created in organisations. The work will also make contributions to policy development in Scotland as related to investment in workplace learning for the benefit of the economy.

sgsss-dtc and sds logoThe study is supported through a partnership between Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences – Doctoral Training Centre (SGSSS-DTC) and Skills Development Scotland. It is hosted by the Information Science pathway of the SGSSS-DTC.

Success factors in information systems project management: newly published review of the literature

calculator, pen, and reportThe latest issue of Information Research is published this week. It includes the article ‘Factors, frameworks and theory: a review of the information systems literature on success factors in project management‘, which I co-authored with Dr Robert Irvine. This work is a critical evaluation of the literature on success factors in information systems projects, with a particular focus on organisational information systems development. In the article we identify four broad research themes on success factors in information systems project management. Continue reading

Introducing Dr Laura Muir, Dr Gemma Webster, and Dr Tom Kane

Welcome to Dr Laura Muir, Dr Gemma Webster, and Dr Tom Kane, who have all recently joined the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University. I am looking forward to working with them as members of my research group (the Centre for Social Informatics within the Institute for Informatics and Digital Innovation), and as fellow colleagues within the Information Systems teaching group, which is led by Dr Colin Smith. Continue reading

A week in Aberdeen at iDocQ and i3 2015 #iDocQ2015 #i3rgu

Seven weeks of dissemination

When Leo Appleton presents the slides for our joint-authored paper on the value and impact of public library services on citizenship development at the 11th Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services today, this will mark the end of a busy conference season for the staff and research students in the Centre for Social Informatics. Continue reading

Digital storytelling: an opportunity for libraries to lead in a digital age

Dr Brian Detlor

Brian Detlor

The Centre for Social Informatics is currently hosting a visit of Dr Brian Detlor of McMaster University. Yesterday Brian gave a talk on his research and involvement with the Love your city, share your stories (LYCSYS) digital storytelling initiative in Hamilton, Canada. This initiative is led by the Hamilton Public Library, McMaster University Library, and the City of Hamilton.

Brian explained how LYCSYS involves the capture and dissemination of digital stories from Hamilton citizens. The stories relate to significant cultural and historical icons in a wide variety of digital formats, and the use of library resources (for example, photographs, geo-coded digital maps, archival material) to enrich and support the digital stories produced. The initiative is viewed as a critical community-based mechanism by which to promote the City of Hamilton’s cultural identity, and to contribute to the preservation of Hamilton’s history. Continue reading

DREaM Again moves into the data analysis phase

DREaM logoSince the end of May my colleague Dr Bruce Ryan and I have been investigating the long-term impact of the AHRC-funded DREaM project (for which I was Principal Investigator in 2011 and 2012), and the forms that such impact has taken.

As part of this work we have been considering what ‘impact’ means in the context of library and information science (LIS), and how this relates to conceptions of the term in other domains where there is a perceived research-practice gap, such as policing, social work and nursing. This first part of the study has been based on an analysis of the extant literature. We intend to write this up as a review paper.

Continue reading