A research student’s reflections of a ‘magical year’

What happens when you swap Switzerland for Scotland, a salary for a stipend, work for study, and leave the familiarity of life-long friends and family for a community of academic colleagues in a University far from home?

This is what Iris Buunk did one year ago when she joined us in the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University to embark on a research project on the impact of social media tools on tacit knowledge sharing practice.

Read how much Iris’ life has changed in one magical year since she moved to Edinburgh in October 2014, as recounted on her blog The knowledge explorer. It’s a wonderful tale of what can be gained from giving up.


One magical city: autumn sunrise over Arthur’s Seat from the Meadows, Edinburgh

Organisational learning and innovation in Scotland: research student Lyndsey Jenkins begins her study

Lyndsey Jenkins

Lyndsey Jenkins

Welcome to Lyndsey Jenkins who has just joined us as a new research student within the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University. I am Lyndsey’s Director of Studies, with Professor Robert Raeside, Director of the Employment Research Institute at Edinburgh Napier University, as second supervisor. Lyndsey’s study is entitled Enhancing the capacity for workplace learning and innovation in Scotland. 

This ESRC-funded research will investigate innovation and best practice in skills development in the workplace in Scotland, drawing comparisons with the rest of the UK and other countries. Lyndsey will explore how employee-led workforce learning can be encouraged to deliver innovation that leads to competitive advantage, employment growth, and increased productivity. The aims of the work are to: Continue reading

Success factors in information systems project management: newly published review of the literature

calculator, pen, and reportThe latest issue of Information Research is published this week. It includes the article ‘Factors, frameworks and theory: a review of the information systems literature on success factors in project management‘, which I co-authored with Dr Robert Irvine. This work is a critical evaluation of the literature on success factors in information systems projects, with a particular focus on organisational information systems development. In the article we identify four broad research themes on success factors in information systems project management. Continue reading

Introducing Dr Laura Muir, Dr Gemma Webster, and Dr Tom Kane

Welcome to Dr Laura Muir, Dr Gemma Webster, and Dr Tom Kane, who have all recently joined the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University. I am looking forward to working with them as members of my research group (the Centre for Social Informatics within the Institute for Informatics and Digital Innovation), and as fellow colleagues within the Information Systems teaching group, which is led by Dr Colin Smith. Continue reading

A week in Aberdeen at iDocQ and i3 2015 #iDocQ2015 #i3rgu

Seven weeks of dissemination

When Leo Appleton presents the slides for our joint-authored paper on the value and impact of public library services on citizenship development at the 11th Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services today, this will mark the end of a busy conference season for the staff and research students in the Centre for Social Informatics. Continue reading

Digital storytelling: an opportunity for libraries to lead in a digital age

Dr Brian Detlor

Brian Detlor

The Centre for Social Informatics is currently hosting a visit of Dr Brian Detlor of McMaster University. Yesterday Brian gave a talk on his research and involvement with the Love your city, share your stories (LYCSYS) digital storytelling initiative in Hamilton, Canada. This initiative is led by the Hamilton Public Library, McMaster University Library, and the City of Hamilton.

Brian explained how LYCSYS involves the capture and dissemination of digital stories from Hamilton citizens. The stories relate to significant cultural and historical icons in a wide variety of digital formats, and the use of library resources (for example, photographs, geo-coded digital maps, archival material) to enrich and support the digital stories produced. The initiative is viewed as a critical community-based mechanism by which to promote the City of Hamilton’s cultural identity, and to contribute to the preservation of Hamilton’s history. Continue reading